Synopsis

In Kisumu, Kenya a surprising approach to HIV prevention relies on building bonds between two unlikely groups: police officers and sex workers.

Enemies to Allies was an official selection of the 2017 WVN Online Film Festival.

About Julie Winokur

Julie Winokur, executive director of Talking Eyes Media, has been a storyteller for over two decades, first as a magazine writer and then as a documentary filmmaker. She launched Talking Eyes in 2002 as a way to focus on creating visual media that catalyzes positive social change. Her work has appeared on PBS, the Documentary Channel, MediaStorm, National Geographic Magazine and Discovery online, as well as in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, and MSNBC.com. Beyond broadcast and publication, Winokur works extensively with non-profit organizations to develop their messages and put Talking Eyes’ films to work at the grassroots level. She is also on the faculty of the International Center of Photography.

Director’s Statement

In Kisumu, Kenya’s third largest city, police abuse of sex workers was rampant. Extortion, physical and psychological abuse were commonplace, and sex workers’ rights were violated. This resulted in sex workers not receiving essential health services and police officers contributing to the spread of HIV.

Through a novel approach, a local NGO called Keeping Alive Societies’ Hope (KASH) has fought to reverse that trend by building better relationships between these former adversaries. By offering training programs, HIV testing in the red light district, and even volleyball games, KASH hopes that its approach will prove more effective than promoting condom use.

For more information on the film please visit Talking Eyes Media.